This page features art created by Art Of Uniformity's founder Shireen Jamehdor. The works showcased below are available for purchase as prints at https://shireenrenee.pictorem.com with 20% of proceeds donated to charity for each print sold.

 

Original oil painting by Shireen Jamehdor with 20% of proceeds going towards donations for the Afghanistan crisis"Vestalis" © Shireen Renée Art

The conflict in Afghanistan is causing the most violence, abuse and exploitation among women and children. A portion of proceeds for this print will be donated to support the International Rescue Committee for aiding Afghans in crisis. The IRC has been providing aid in Afghanistan since 1988 by sheltering displaced families, supplying clean water/sanitation and cash assistance among many other services. You can learn more at https://www.rescue.org/article/help-afghanistan-what-do-afghans-need-now

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 Oil painting portrait of African Venus."Vénus Africaine" © Shireen Renée Art

This oil painting was inspired by a bronze statue created by a French artist from the19th century named Charles Cordier. Many of his works are on display at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris, but this is one of my favorites. A portion of proceeds for these prints will go towards the Sphinx Organization, a non-profit committed to addressing the underrepresentation of young Black and Latinx musicians, specifically in classical music. Since childhood, my parents had me and my two sisters involved in music. Learning and playing music has had such a positive impact on my life, and I believe all kids should have that opportunity. Studies have shown that learning how to play music at a young age has many mental, cognitive, social and physical benefits. Learn more about the Sphinx Organization by visiting https://www.sphinxmusic.org/.  

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Native American portrait art for charity

"Man-infest Destiny" © Shireen Renée Art

This painting is a social commentary regarding the Native American narrative in the United States. The man featured in this painting is named Bear Bull, a member of the Blackfoot tribe from the early 1900s whose picture was taken by photographer Edward S. Curtis. 10% of profits from these prints will go toward the First Nations Development Institute, a non-profit organization committed to improving economic conditions for Native Americans through various programs. You can learn more about this organization by visiting www.firstnations.org